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6 Tips for radiologists to reduce burnout and redefine the path to retirement

When you’re a radiologist, your work isn’t just what you do—it’s who you are.

The career is all-consuming; if you follow a traditional path in private practice, you simply have to come to terms with the fact that you’ll devote your life to it—and for nine years, I did.

But when I found myself approaching 40 and already feeling burned out—and Googling around to see whether maybe I could become a history teacher instead of a radiologist—I began to wonder why there weren’t options where I could put my hard-earned skills as a radiologist to use without being exhausted all the time or counting down the days to retirement.

7 myths and misperceptions about teleradiology

 

My journey to teleradiology started with an invitation during residency to join several vRad radiologists for dinner in San Diego. Having trained in a busy academic setting that came with nearly 2 hours per day spent commuting and a never-ending queue of studies to read, I was curious about my options.

As I learned more about the day-to-day work of teleradiology over dinner and in subsequent conversations, I came to realize a lot of what I had thought about teleradiology was outdated and wrong. As I approached my graduation from residency in June 2020–in the midst of the 1st peak of the COVID pandemic–I decided it was an opportune time to give teleradiology a try and so I signed on with vRad in lieu of continuing on as a Fellow in the hospital setting. When I did, I saw firsthand how much reading remotely has to offer in comparison with traditional onsite radiology practices. It also became more and more clear to me that the taboo surrounding teleradiology is often based on myths and misperceptions. Here are some of the biggest incorrect assumptions that I believe are worth debunking:

2022 Radiologist Job Market Update: High Volume, High Pay, and a Search for High Quality of Life

 

More than two years after the onset of the pandemic, changes in COVID-related policies and postures — as well as accompanying cultural shifts in the workplace — continue to drive trends in the job market for radiologists. In 2022, things look markedly different than during the early stages of the pandemic and it’s clear that radiologist job seekers now have many options and greater workplace flexibility.

In my role as Medical Director for vRad, I work very closely with our physician recruiters. Between us we interview hundreds of radiologists every year as they explore options for their next career move. This experience along with the other datapoints available from serving 2,100 imaging facilities and radiology groups nationwide give us unique insights into the radiologist job market nationally.

8 questions to ask yourself before deciding which radiology practice to join

High demand for imaging combined with a finite supply of board-certified physicians means radiologists can be selective about where and how they practice. Before you choose, examine your own goals and motivations—both personal and professional. Then, find a radiology practice whose culture and processes align with your career expectations and work/life balance needs.

Following are eight questions to ask yourself, along with a few considerations for each.

Helping female radiologists battle the disproportionate burden of burnout

Burnout is a horrible thing. And while recent research suggests it affects half of all radiologists, women are bearing the brunt – with 56% of female physicians reporting they’re burned out compared to only 41% of their male counterparts.

Why? In addition to the common burnout factors affecting all radiologists, researchers have also concluded that women are disproportionally shouldering the burden of increased demands at home like eldercare, childcare, and family healthcare. This and the lack of flexibility within practices to balance work and life are making it all the more important for women to consider where they work, what impacts their happiness, and the control they have over their own burnout.

6 Questions Every Radiologist Should Ask Before Reading Remotely

Radiologists are looking for more work-life balance. In response, practices of all sizes have been letting rads read from home.

But here’s the catch. By itself, teleradiology doesn’t optimize work-life balance. In fact, a virtual workplace can be every bit as demanding and draining as a traditional office. If you don’t have access to seasoned, telehealth-specific technology, support and culture—you’re only jumping from frying pan to fire when you work remotely.

As a physician recruiter, I speak with hundreds of radiologists every year considering remote reading to achieve better work-life balance. Many of whom have found that harmony working for vRad. With that in mind, here are my six must-ask questions for rads doing due diligence on reading remotely.

Teleradiology, a perfect fit for radiologists after residency—whether they pursue a fellowship or not

Originally published by Scott Baginski, MD on Radiology Business

Radiologists have an important choice to make at the beginning of their careers: do they want to start a fellowship after their residency or immediately join a radiology practice?

Both options can be incredibly rewarding for a young radiologist. And the good news is, there’s no wrong answer.

Radiologists often choose to continue their training after their residency and pursue a one-or two-year subspecialty fellowship. On the other hand, some may find that they would rather skip the fellowship and join a practice right away. And that’s great too! You don’t have to be fellowship-trained by any means to have a long, successful career in radiology. Some of the happiest, most successful radiologists I know are general radiologists.

10 reasons I’m a vRad lifer

Originally published by Michael Walter on Radiology Business

Looking back on my career as a radiologist—now in its 22nd year and counting—I see three themes consistently guiding my “work-life balance.” These would be control, culture and lifestyle. Let me explain.

Radiologist Salary Reckoning: Who Has Control Over Your Compensation?

Radiologist salaries average $420,000 to $430,000 annually. Last year was an outlier due to COVID, when the collective figure dipped to around $413,000, according to Medscape’s latest physician salary survey.

Whether or not your salary is in line with these figures, now is a great time to take stock and ask yourself the following:

  1. Am I happy with the money I’m making as a radiologist?
  2. Am I content with the hours I’m putting in to get there?
  3. Am I even in control of my earnings and how hard do I have to work?